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on events. facebook.com/booktv. >> from the 12 and a national book festival in washington, d.c., and interview a national viewer phone calls with "washington post" senior correspondent an associate editor rajiv chandrasekeran who discusses his book "little america: the war within the war for afghanistan." it's about 20 minutes. >> we are back live at the national book festival here in washington, d.c. this is day one of two days of coverage. the book festival has now expanded to two days, and booktv will be live both days. if you want to see our full schedule go to booktv.org. we are pleased now to be joined here on our booktv set with rajiv chandrasekeran, an associate editor at the "washington post," and most recently the author of this book, "little america," about the war in afghanistan. wicked the term little america come from? >> little america came from this remarkable project in the 1950s, led by teams of american engineers to develop parts of southern afghanistan to dig irrigation canals, build dams. in the very same terrain the current troops urge unfolded in. back
from both france and in washington sent a telegram to the embassies, which is not far away and i might telegram there was a message from kissinger, secretary of the state department, telling us the israelis, wait. hold your horses. do not take action because kissinger is going to move on with provided doctors. when the telegram was sent from the state department to the embassy during yom kippur, the egyptian and syrian armies were already on their way to destroy the jewish state. that is an example of a mistake because the leader at the time, she was afraid to take a preemptive attack. she was afraid to hold the reserve because she said i don't know what will be the reaction in washington. and dr. kissinger was very strong. nixon was going down, he was going up and she was afraid from his reaction. because of her approach, we almost lost the world. that is why today we do with the issue of iran, we have to take the decision which is good for israel. maybe it will not be popular in the u.n. for sure. everything you say about israel and the standard of the one sponsored by u.s. money of
. up until then more from this morning's "washington journal" focus on domestic program cuts. >> host: domestic spending cuts is on the table for the fiscal cliff talks. two different perspectives for you here. isabel sawhill, brookings institution. brookings center on children and families. james capretta ethics and public policy center and visiting scholar at aei. let me begin with you. are these potential domestic cuts under sequestration devastating or manageable? >> guest: somewhere in between. not a good idea. they would be very deep cuts, you know, an 8% cut across the board is a very significant one-time cut for any program to sustain in immediate year period. so they're not a good idea. would it be the end of the world, no? >> host: what do you mean by that? >> guest: well, i mean there would be downsizing of a lot of services across the government in terms of the domestic accounts. so it would be fewer services being provided. there would be reduced federal employees. some grant programs would take a haircut of five, 10%. so there would be downsizing of the services provided
the military option. shriver opposed this reordering of priorities, generating the observation in washington and elsewhere, quote: like the poor, we have shriver always with us, end of quote. nevertheless, between 1964 and 1968 one-third of america's poor moved upward out of poverty. by the spring of 1968, tension over the budget priorities led shriver to give up on what had become an impossible task and to take the ambassadorship to france. when the democrats met that summer in stormy chicago, shriver's name again came up for the vice presidency. in fact, he had an acceptance speech written and reservations on a flight from paris to chicago. but once again the kennedy family, still grieving from the recent death of robert, raised an objection in favor of ted. so shriver remained in paris until 1970. his success in repairing the alliance with france weakened birdies agreement about the vietnam -- by disagreement about the vietnam war, had prompted president pix son to retain him -- nixon to retain him in office. not long afterwards came the 1972 election when democratic nominee george mcgove
to wrap a. >> my name is -- [inaudible] -- washington d.c. what's missing on discussions is the fact that islamists have nothing to offer except for sharia law and muslims are fed up with the sharia law. the other point is there's a new new generation of arabs that face the people. i wrote an article about this, who are very different than their fathers and grandfathers. which we should be focusing on. >> can make it to a question? >> -- something we should be focusing on. our democracy by islamist ideology. what shall we do about the threat to democracy the case arabs are going to sort their problems out. this is the first time they're focusing on their own homegrown problems gloominess and israelis and other people. what should we do about the ideology that is focusing on destruction of democracies? >> would anybody like to take out one? >> it begins by recognizing what it is. a couple of years ago before these tahrir square movement, there is a prominent article about my son brother had. the term moderate is a separate term because to us it means someone like ice. but in reality,
between washington, d.c. and new york prefer to take the train. it's not because that is always cheaper. because the service is not. it's because of the time savings and convenience. >> mr. boardman, for the northeast corridor, 80% of the population lives within 25 miles of the northeast corridor making the rail very, very accessible. how would you compare that with california? >> depends on the part of california. one of the things i can answer is, congressman, is that the air rail service between san diego and l.a. is entirely real because it just doesn't work the way that that has, as close as the arts which have and the way that it operates. but when you get to something like l.a. to san francisco you really only have the coast starlight. so there's a sufficient amount of data that would really tell you what really happened here. so from that regard, the old drink am anna karenina right now what they called it, i guess it was the coast daylight, was the primary way they moved up until 15 years ago between san francisco and l.a., and it was probably the most profitable of the private
carried that message straight to washington. i remember scott telling me in our very first meeting that i couldn't count on his vote. that i'd have to earn it. i told him could do whatever he pleased and while he hasn't been here long, he certainly made his mark. i've seen a lot of politicians in my day, but few if any have been as talented as scott brown. he is a unique talent. and i have no doubt we'll see him back in washington someday in the not-too-distant future. the truth is scott's victory wasn't the first time he'd done what others thought impossible. as a young man, he knew poverty first hand, and a broken home. and even took to shoplifting to feed himself and his sister. yet scott overcame these early challenges and as is often the case, he owes a lot of it to an adult who saw his potential early on. in scott's case, that adult was judge samuel zall. when scott showed up in his chambers one day, the judge saw a troubled but decent young man who needed a friendly nudge. we had a long talk about the talent i thought he had, and i didn't want to see him squander it, judge zall lat
by the library of congress in washington d.c.. >> earlier this year doctored billing sten named walter dean myers as the third national ambassador for young people's literature. this is a project of the center for the book with a children's book counsel and it's a nonprofit arm, every child the reader. the notion of the national ambassador would be someone who traveled the country on behalf of young people's literature, promoting it and also expanding the audience for reading in every way that we can think of. my proper today you already have. on the table in the back there is a bookmark which has walters photo and also a free explanation of the national ambassador program. it lasted for two years. walter is midway through his two-year term, speaking on behalf of reading and today we are going to learn a little bit about his experience but i would like to start by asking him how he chose his particular theme for his act to the, which is "reading is not an option." walter, do you want to tell us a little bit about how that came to be your theme and a little bit about -- who i happen to know it's h
to be in charge the coverage was there. i am not sure a lot of that registered in washington intelligence community where we had a different sense of the soviet leadership we were acquiring as we went through the dialogue it became difficult to look what we were getting from the intelligence side and what we received across the table but in geneva as president reagan met gorbachev the first time the two of them met in front of a fireplace conversation later walking along the lake and began to see the emergence where people accept and believe in president reagan's view of the role of nuclear weapons, very real distasteful. the key documents that emerged from geneva besides agreements later, the key document, the joint statement at the beginning, two leaders agree nuclear war can never be won and must never be fought. there were negotiations going on at the time, negotiations going on in geneva but they began to take their lead from the summit discussions. we were not able easily to get to the washington summit. kept running into bilateral issues in which one of our correspondents was picke
at the podium. he can second will be eric trager. he is the washington institute's next generation fellow. he is a doctoral candidate at the university of pennsylvania where he completed a dissertation and he is going to give us some special insight into some of the details of mohammed morsi and the muslim brotherhood in the quest to achieve a constitution. and then we have third, i am pleased to introduce a diplomat of the area. he served in egypt for 2005 through 2010. shalom cohen. he has considerable it's aryans with the relationship and the politics we are seeing on the ground today. first we have steve and eric and then shalom cohen, and then we will open up the discussion for your questions and comments. >> good afternoon. it is a tremendous ledger to be back at the washington institute. i feel a a little nervous, i feel like i'm performing for my first grade teacher again. but it is a great pleasure. this is where, as rob pointed out, my career began. also, those of you who know me, this is where my family began. i am sure that many of you in washington can relate to what is going on
's going on. we've conveyed very frankly, candidly to the chinese in both washington d.c. and beijing in my case. >> in beijing, what is the view that you can tell of kim jong-un about what power he has, who he is, what its capabilities are to stay in north korea? >> the chinese believe we need to give north korea a chance in and develop economically. china would like all the parties that are part of the six party talks to get back to the table and to see if we can't encourage better behavior from north korea as opposed to imposing sanctions now and trying to coerce north korea into the fold and abiding by their international obligations. so that's a difference of opinion as strategy. china believes we have to engage with north korea. the united states does every time to try to engage with north korea, they basically turned around and fail to respond to their promises and live up to promises and it gets us nowhere. we don't believe we should reward bad behavior. he knocked what is the most important thing the chinese leaders want from you everyday? what are they looking for? >> they want gr
to washington as often, and i would say, even more often than the alaska members in the house and senate. he made -- they made a point to stop by his office on a regular occasion to talk to him about what has happened in the past, what's going on today, and what they look for in the future. earlier this year, senator inouye was in alaska at my invitation, his last trip to alaska. he told them a memorable story about his support of the trans alaska oil pipeline, which was controversial when he supported it in its construction. now, senator inouye has a unique style of how to tell stories, and you got to just pay attention and listen. they're no very to the point. senator inouye told this story told by opponents of the pipe lynn that it would -- of the pipeline that it would destroy the caribou. this was what he would told over and over again. again in his last trip, he was in front of a group of people, and i was anxious as he started to tawfnlg he said, i have this story tell you. he talked about this time of controversy about the alaska north slope and the oil pipeline and the caribou and w
ii memorial in washington, d.c. this the ceremony includes remarks by the vice chairman of the joint chief. [sirens] ♪ ♪ ♪ ?eet ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ladies and gentlemen, will be delivered by lieutenant colonel. >> our help is in the name of the lord who made help and earth. the souls of the righteous are in the hand of god. those -- be destroyed but the name liveth for ever more. let us pray. almighty god, creator and sustainer, we offer to you endless of thanks thanksgiving and praise today. we reremember a time of great tyranny in our world. we remember world war ii. we also remember those who stood their ground against great tyranny. those who fought here at home and on the battle fronts to ensure that tyranny would not prevail. we thank you that in the hour of need you gave men and women the strength and resolve to stand no matter the cost. may those brave souls who still remain here with us feel today your hand of favor and strength. for those who remain with us today, receive renewed hope and awareness of our gratitude for their bravery and sacrifice. we ask for y
on the line every day in distant lands have to worry about whether those who in washington can effectively support them. we are down to the wire now. in these next few days, congress needs to make the right decision and to avoid the fiscal disaster that awaits us. my hope is that they will do the right thing and that we will achieve a bipartisan consensus on deficit reduction and the trajectory of defense spending in the future. otherwise, we will weaken this nation in the minds of our allies, our partners, and our potential adversaries, and undermined the work as a sacrifices that our troops are making every single day. it's easy to get cynical and frustrated in this town. and after 40 years, i know my level of cynicism and frustration. but my confidence and my hope for the future is restored every time i have the opportunity to visit with our troops on the front lines, as i did last week. in them, i see the spirit of public service that has kept this country strong for more than two centuries and which has helped us to overcome every period of crisis and adversity in our history. that sp
in washington. >> we have to have you comment as an employee of usa today on u.s. aid tomorrow. >> and the day after. the newspaper in september was 30 years old so a bunch of reporters were sent out to talk to people who could predict what the world would be like 30 years from now which would be what are we talking about? 20, 40, 2042. >> we talked about what it means for their industry and we put out a little tab and now that tab, broadsheet is now an e-book which i think you can buy for the grand total of $1.99. it hasn't really taken off yet. the short form somewhere in between a book and magazine, there are a lot of good ones, amazon has been doing them, they posted almost immediately and they sell for $2 or $3. a few of them have made the best-seller list, some have been fiction. amy tan wrote the story she called too long to be a short story and too short to be a novel and focused on that. >> the wars continue to produce books including "little america: the war within the war for afghanistan," tom ricks, "the generals," the killing of osama bin laden and another book on the killing of o
. there are no awards, there are no commemorative statues, all he has in his offices are pictures of washington and hawaii. that's he humility he showed his entire life. there was no staff there just the two of us. we talked for an hour. i would always remember -- having passed away yesterday, it will be imbedded in my mind. as we left, we both thought about fact we had not been able to sit down and talk like that enough. he professed at that time -- his words -- how lucky he has been his whole life. he said i got at emphysema now. i said, not from smoking. he said, i learn to smoke in the war as a boy. he smoked from 1944 to 1967. he told me he had lung cancer. but they were wrong. they took part of his lung out. he talked about how lucky he had been with surviving what he fought with lung can certification but how lucky he had been his while life, for example, the war. i'm sure people would not reflect on his massive injuries as being lucky. butth but he considered he was lucky to have lived. he had been called upon with three other people, three other soldiers, to cross a river in the dark o
one of which in washington is almost been totally discredited because they really haven't included a broad swath of the opposition, broad enough that would have legitimacy with the opposition back in syria itself. but there are some attempts and people are thinking about these things-perhaps because of what happened in iraq in 2003. >> wonderful. one more. yes, please. >> what this likelihood that the regime will use chemical weapons and what should we or could we do if they do? >> good question. that's one of the questions that no one has an answer, understand what circumstances would the regime use chemical weapons. i suspect they don't want to use them because that would galvanize the exact international response they're trying to avoid. the don't want this type of mass blood-letting that will compel the international community to intervene much more assertively than it has. so i don't think they're going to use chemical weapons. the fear is, though, if the regime -- if the opposition gains the upper hand, if the regime is on its last legs will they want to go down in flames or
of the james stewart goes to washington. if we're going have filibuster, i think we should have those rules in place, what we do need do is change it so that mr. smith stays on the floor during the filibuster. it doesn't just run time against the senate and go to senate forum calls for indefinitely periods of time while waiting for the time frame to go so you can the vote. it doesn't make any sense to do that. if somebody feels strongly enough they want to bring the senate to a halt, they should be willing to stay there on the floor and explain why or -- i think it will be self-sort of self-enforcing that people will be less likely to file a filibuster as often as they have been through the record. the number of filibusters filed over the last two or three or four years super creeds anything in the past. if they can't work together, can't get anything done, and look one of the -- one of my staffers wants the senate to be docked pay for quorum calls. it's points well made. >> c-span2 viewers would appreciate that. >> absolutely. >> any other senate rules or proceedings that you think need re
conservative think tanks here in washington has . south carolina. at times playing the good cop, the bad cop, but always -- always trying to work together. and what differences we've had have been sincere, and that's the word i would use about senator demint. he sincerely believes in his cause. he's a -- he sincerely believes in his causes. he's a sincere voice that people in our party look to for leadership and guidance. what he's done over the last four years to build a conservative movement, to get people involved in politics, like marco rubio, who jim helped early on in his primary i just think is going to be a great legacy. from a state point of view, we have lost one of our great champions. but he and debbie, jim and debbie have raised four wonderful children. they got great grandkids, and i know jim is looking forward to staying involved in pushing the conservative cause outside the body. he was an effective voice in the senate, whether you agreed with jim or not. he really did strongly and passionately advocate for his positions and did it very effectively. jim made the republican pa
bureaucracy in washington that this report has clearly revealed. why for a civil have made toward the longstanding recommendation of the government accountability office that the department perform a strategic review that they carry at the necessary security measures that the diplomats abroad and ensure that all necessary actions are present to prevent a recurrence. i know there will be an attempt to shift the responsibility for the tragedy to a shortage of resources. requests for more money are a familiar refrain in the state department reports. but budgetary constraints or not a factor in the department's failure to recognize the threats and adequately respond to this situation in benghazi that is and about misplaced priorities. if this department intends to blame its long string of failures on an adequate funding, then perhaps it should take a closer look at the money that is being lavished on the global climate change, colin marie diplomacy programs another fever project. this money could have been used for providing diplomatic security including hiring additional personnel an
think-tanks here in washington. my reaction for the people of south carolina is you've lost a great, strong, conservative voice, someone who has championed the conservative cause and represented our state with distinction, sincerity and -- and a great deal of passion. on a personal level, i've lost my colleague and friend. jim and i've known each other for almost 20 years now and i think we've done a pretty darned good job for south carolina. at times playing the good cop, the bad cop, but always -- always trying to work together. and what differences we've had have been sincere, and that's the word i would use about senator demint. he sincerely believes in his cause. he's a -- he sincerely believes in his causes. he's a sincere voice that people in our party look to for leadership and guidance. what he's done over the last four years to build a conservative movement, to get people involved in politics, like marco rubio, who jim helped early on in his primary i just think is going to be a great legacy. from a state point of view, we have lost one of our great champions. but he and d
press club here in washington today. he will talk about election shun reform. c-span will have it live beginning at 1:00 eastern. at 7:00 eastern c-span will be live with a discussion on skilled immigrants. virginia senator mark warner is talking about a bill that will allow more highly killed immigrants into the united states. it will be hosted by the university of virginia. >>> we've had explosions of knowledge in medicine but we've not coordinated care. all these services we have end up having so many cracks that the cracks are as harmful as the diseases that we're treating and you got to step back and ask, you know, are we hurting people over all, i mean on a global level? what are we doing sometimes? and of course now we've got the institute of medicine report saying 30% of everything we do may not be necessary in health care, when we step back, 30% of all the medications we prescribe, the tests we order, the procedures? this is something i think which is for the first time, really being called out as a problem. >> dysfunction in the u.s. health care industry. dr. marty makary on
retirement benefits imaginable, they have come here to washington, d.c., to tell congress that we should cut social security benefits for disabled veterans, raise taxes on low-income workers. so let me just tell you what some call a tweak would do. in terms of the chained c.p.i., more than 3.2 million disabled veterans receive disability compensation from the veterans administration. 3.2 million veterans, they would see a reduction, a significant reduction in their benefits. under the chained c.p.i., a disabled veteran who started receiving v.a. disability benefits at age 30 would have their benefits cut by more than $1,400 at age 45, $2,300 at age 55 and $3,200 at age 65. does anybody in their right mind think that the american people want to see benefits cut for men and women who sacrificed, who lost limbs defending their country? are we going to balance the budget on their backs? i challenge anyone who supports a chained c.p.i. to go to walter reed hospital, visit with the men and women who have lost their legs, lost their arms, lost their eyesight as a result of their service in afghanis
to represent the nation's second largest state in the u.s. senate. kay came to washington ready to work. she established herself early on as a leader on transportation and nasa and as a fighter for lower taxes and smaller, smarter government. kay won a claim as an advocate for science and competitiveness, helped secure bipartisan support for the landmark america competes act, and she became known throughout the state for the close attention she paid to constituents. shortly after her election to the senate, kay began a tradition imitated by many others since of holding weekly constituent meetings over coffee whenever the senate's in session. the groups usually ranged in size from 100-150, and at any given coffee, you might come across families in bermuda shorts, bankers in pinstripes or college football players. over the years, kay has hosted about 50,000 people in her office through these coffees, but her attention to constituent service goes well beyond that. back home, she is one of the few politicians in texas who has actually visited all 254 counties, some of which are home to more catt
program of this kind. passenger rail and our states of oregon and washington has been in place since 1994 where we have partnered from the state level with amtrak, and in our state, burlington northern santa fe, in a collaborative approach to an incremental delivery of high and higher speed rail programs and service. so as we've been investing over the years, we see the implementation in the creation of a national vision as a very important part of what we are trying to deliver. we have a 460-mile corridor between eugene, oregon, and vancouver, british columbia. we have achieved in the last year up to 850 passengers, 50,000 passengers, and our growth is increasing year over year in the 10% rate. we have in our state invested over $480 million in capital and operations in amtrak cascades, which is what we call our program. but it wasn't until the recovery act came that we're able to make significant capital infrastructure improvements on the rail itself. sightings, double tracking, positive train control, all those amenities that will benefit high and higher speed rail, and more frequent s
washington post." dr. ashton carter, deputy secretary of defense. allyson fitzgerald, a freelance journalist and the chairwoman of the speaker's committee. i'm going to speak this -- skip the speaker for a minute. adana, reporter for usa today and past president of the national press club and speakers' committee organized today's luncheon. dr. jim miller, undersecretary of the defense policy. larry moffey editing manager army magazine. john, past president of the national press club and former commander of american legion post number 20 at the national press club. joe, incoming editor-in-chief, aviation week and past chairman of the national press club board of governors. paul schenck minn, national security reporter, u.s. news and world report. [applause] just 18 months ago our guest today leon panetta presented as the cia director over the one of daring operations in the country's history. the operation spier their lead on osama bin laden secret compound in pakistan. three days ago defense secretary leon panetta landed in turkey where he signed an order that was then patriot missile battle
. while those back to washington d.c. the testify in court? is just not doable. i think that he is quite right that within the unique concepts -- context of guantanamo bay where we half for a handful of detainees left and have engaged essentially in a war of choice, although with respect to the war on terror, more broadly and obviously we have to fight back against terrorism in some capacity. the underlying nature of the detention authority is not that these people being held for crimes. there being held prevented league as a matter of preventive detention to ensure they don't get back on the field and have an opportunity to kill our soldiers. the question becomes, when you take their reasonableness of the d.c. circuit's handling of the responsibilities of the supreme court with respect to this relatively small population, there's no question, the united states, given all of our wealth of resources can handle habeas cases dealing with a few hundred detainees data guantanamo bay. were up putting more people there because we don't want to have to do with the burdens of doing it but we can
," which is a classic of washington, i think, no one should go to washington without reading that book. [laughter] max boot, in the times when laws and rules and principles of strategy seem to be overwhelmed or out of date, he's become thee authoritative voice on military affairs always with amazing, consistent, unquestioned integrity, which is also kind of a rarity in the field which is marked often by to littization, and we are looking forward to more work. jay, who i just met a moment ago, i think we all here realize that serious thought an international affairs requires the widest range of reference that you can't just focus on one corner of the strategic realm, and you see his name, the authors line, you know you're about to get something with tremendous explanatory power, and with writings that go across the culture of the country and the arts. calling into account that annual fraud, the nobel peace prize -- [laughter] after they call it, nobody can ever say "nobel peace prize" again without saying so ironically. i'll turn it over to them, and i think we'll start with elliot, if
's ecowas write the book. i have a lot practiced in washington for many years. i felt ultimately that i would put it together and piece it together. a magazine article and it expanded and it became what it is right now. always in my mind, i want young people to know. i want young people to know the this happened and so it took a while. my brother is a writer in new york and he was my editor for a while. i fired him three times, and i went back with the help of my wife, back into my first year of legal research because i had to certify, authorize this piece of nonfiction. i felt with a memoir you could just wing it you can't because once you start highlighting things you've got to get authority for it. you even have to get consent from the people that you put photographs and. i had a letter from james meredith right after i left, which is in the book itself and i wanted to put that in. my wife reminded me, we need his permission. i don't need his permission. he sent it to me that he didn't send us the world. i send a form letter to jackson mississippi and he signed it on the backside of
in washington, d.c. however, the proximity of the south caucasus to iran as well as strong relationship with armenia, azerbaijan and georgia. have with both of the united states and israel, it increases the appeal of the iranians for targeting those countries. i applaud those governments in the region for the vigilance against the iranian threat. however, i'm particularly concerned about the security at the u.s. embassy as the agent location of the facility leave our people there particularly vulnerable. i often find myself comparing the geopolitics of the south caucasus to accordion not. a tangle of current events of these countries in the region isolated from their neighbors. unfortunately, such isolation can blame to the hands of hours laying on the periphery of the region. press reports and conversations i had while i was in the region indicate that iran is taking or at least has the potential to take advantage of armenians regional isolation and thus the country's economic dependence on their common border to use armenian banks and enterprises to skirt international sanctions. the
] >> welcome again to the foundation for defense of democracy's annual washington forum. my name is kenneth schwartz. i have the pleasure of introducing distinguished public official robert kc, senior senator from the state of pennsylvania. you served since 2007 as chairman of near east and south asia subcommittee, senate foreign relations committee only in the first term. one can scarcely imagine a more challenging time, the past two years in the middle east have seen wars in international borders, collapse of regimes in decades and the rise of political movements that may yet turn hostile in the united states and its allies. new developments, he has led the way on many issues of great concern to ftd. he is founder and co-chair of the bipartisan senate caucus on weapons of mass destruction, terrorism, in that capacity worked across the partisan divide to highlight serious threats of -- weapons of mass deliberation. he has done as much to run our greatest threat in the middle east and often lead the way on pressure advancing nuclear activities and efforts to destabilize the middle east. in
in washington d.c. this is just over 40 minutes. >> great. thanks very much, david. thank you to all of you. thank you, senator casey. grateful for your remarks and service. we are going to do a topic that is going to sound technical, non-proliferation policy in the wake of the arab spring, but i want to put this to some human terms. this is the sum of all of your panel. i spent the entire night last night time to think of a way to do this and entertaining and humorous way. there is no such a way. this is about weapons of mass destruction in the middle east. it is a serious topic, and we have very serious experts. people who are the leading rights in non-proliferation. joe had the privilege of spending a year working with in a project on the lease nonproliferation, and we're going to have a very detailed report that we will be issuing in january. well over 100 pages already. very specific recommendations on how to deal with this grave threat. we have talked about the iranian nuclear program, the pursuit of nuclear weapons, the implications to the ad states, israel, our allies, the possi
plus, your e-mails, phone calls and tweets. washington journal, live tuesday, at 7:00 a.m. eastern, on c-span. >> now, latinos and the 2012 election, and what policy issues influenced their vote. speakers included former white house adviser to latin american, soto, and alfonso aguilar.: this is about two hours. [inaudible conversations] s. >> this is i think, as you all know, a place where public policy and research meet. i bring together the world of ideas with the world of policy action. very happy that tim johnson, the director of the latin american program is here this morning. and also want to acknowledge sal low star who had a lot to do with the planning, and this is an event we're cosponsoring with immigration works, to tamar a jacoby, and arizona state university, working on the issues. i want to acknowledge cardenas, a former governor and distinguished mexican colleague and many other good friends. and mane others back at the woodrow wilson system. and dan, who is out of government and into this civilian life. there's no doubt the latino vote was important in this past ele
and why we did it was not based on the speech from washington because it was love of the man next to you. it is a cliche will men jumping out of the trench but that does not keep it from being true. questions like that i focus on the small part that i could do something about. >> the war is as small as it is for you. a general expressing opinion is something we could use more of. but the overall worry is if someone is hiding something, what else are they hiding? how much of anything is ever true? it is on a level of such high discussion that you have to diffuse the bomb and i have to keep 150 marines from being dead. does anyone notice? becomes over detachments of how much of the war is real to those not actively in engaged on the ground. >> i am not a veteran but i see myself as an advocate just because he sits right here. i wanted to read the passage if you keep said general betray as high jinks in mind this is what the first attendant was going through a 1.2 thousand seven. >> up the mountain the first platoon regaining used to a lifestyle even more spartan than the one down the hill.
street journal" and another eight for "the washington post". in the course of this work, he reported on places as varied as somalia, bosnia, iraq and afghanistan, and he's been part of two teams that won the pulitzer prize. as i've gotten to know tom over these past few years, eve learned that he's that rarest of finds: a disruptive thinker whose energy and creativity combine in an interesting way. he constantly pushing us to think more nimbly and more provocatively, and that's a spirit that infuses tom's new book, "the generals." he explores generalship of good and bad. he traces the history of george marshall from world war ii, william westmoreland in vietnam to colin powell in the gulf war and to the generals who commanded in iraq from 2003 on. the generals argue that is the military's changed in the way it rewards good generalship and punishes bad and that the gulf has grown ever wider. tom's is a provocative argument and one that we will examine in some detail. joining tom is susan glaser, one of the nation's top national security journalists. susan's the editor-in-chief of fore
for the disabled. >> and tomorrow morning's "washington journal", peter welch, on the latest development of the fiscal cliff negotiation. after that, joe shaw looks at the estate tax, which is set to go up the end of the year plus, your e-mails, phone calls, and tweets. "washington journal" is live at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. now come in a discussion of how the military and national security might be a affected by spending cuts at the first of the year. part of the so-called fiscal cliff. former chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, mike mike mullen, was joined at how services committee. this is a less than an hour. >> good afternoon. thank you for coming. my name is peter peterson. i would like to give you a review of why we are supporting this project today. starting about 30 years ago, after studying the profound demographic trends, on the vast and unfunded promise we have made. i have decided was not unsustainable, but a primary threat to the future. speaking of unsustainable, in the nixon white house in which i served, the chairman of the council, if something is unsustainable,
marketplace mentioned the best of lists are coming out by publications "washington post," the economist, et cetera have been abrogated at booktv.org. you'll be able to see a lot of the best of 2012 books list. they are under our section called news about books. pulitzers this year, stephen greenblatt won for general nonfiction this word history delete many maribel, one for malcolm x and biography or autobiography. john lewis gaddis, george f. kennan and american life. what is this word about? >> guest: to swerve if i remember right, i admit i dipped into the book when it came out. it's fascinating. it was a little on the side of being i don't want to say -- intellectual. i don't mean to say that dismissively. that is about a palm. help me here. do you remember the name of the palm? we are funky and this exam here. rediscovered in the renaissance and then it changed the way it was published i guess you would say. printed or something. >> host: i didn't mean to but she was the spot there. >> guest: the cultures where did that and put in more modern take on life and the fear of dying is to put
? a it's a slippery slope. i i was on washington journal a month ago and i was asked this question, and if we go in, or if we militarily either more aggressive support in terms of the military aid or boots on the ground, air toast support, what's hezbollah going to do sunset what's iran going to do? what's russia going to do? this is quite volatile and i don't think we have thought out all of the potential possibilities of getting involved in another quagmire in the middle east. and as i said, i have lots of friends there if there was an easy answer to this, if military intervention -- if there was any chance where there was limited damage, collateral damage to our buys -- i use at brook army medical center i used to volunteer in the burn center, the boys coming back from afghan afghanistan and iraq and hit by ied asks other explosions and we have to think of these things before we blindly go in or semi blindly go in, and when i got back home, i received a bunch of e-mails from some generals, colonels, military people, and they were so thankful. they said thank you for bringing tha
washington post," david is a renowned writer of fiction and nonfiction and is later during his most recent string of best-selling works of spy fiction. david is well known for his command of international affairs and his keen insight into the working of government and other factors. with these two gentlemen, we're poised for an illuminating an intriguing conversation about the world, the future and revenge of geography. bald and david, over to you. >> thank you. i think you're probably not supposed to see this as a serious moderator, but i love this book. it's embarrassing how architect it is and how many post its mouth i put not to flatter the teacher but because i really liked it. i'm going to try to walk the audience through this. we have bob walk the audience through and i would like to start with a provocative opening comment that you make. you set my reporting over three decades has convinced me that we all need to recover a sensibility of time and space that has been lost in the information age when the molders of public opinion - against the hours that will to let them talk about t
economy has is right here in washington and our inability to get together across party lines to bring our country back into fiscal balance and to show the country and the world that we have a political system here that is capable of fixing our problems. bob -- earlier this year, bob carr, foreign minister of australia -- one of our greatest allies in the world -- said -- and i quote -- that "the united states is one budget deal away from restoring its global preeminence." the u.s. is one budget deal away from restoring its global preeminence, perhaps because some -- i'm so proud of this country, i'd say we're one budget deal away from restoring our global dominance for a considerable number of years. unfortunately, after i hope and pray we adopt the result of the negotiations going on now and avoid the fiscal cliff, we'll still be one grand bargain, budget deal away from restoring our -- our global preeminence. that work has to be done. but at least we will have avoided the cliff. mr. president, by a twist of fate, the occupant of the chair is my colleague and friend, the senator from con
to washington, it's obvious he will march into the white house. that began that very, very close relationship, that cooperation began in the aftermath of 1967, not before that. >> as you acknowledge, one more book on the six-day war. there have been a lot of them. what do you have new? what kind of things? >> look at my bibliography. i always encounter that question why we need another book on the 1967 war. the principle reason is the phenomenon of the 30-year rule. that is the rule that attained to most western style democracies in the united states in britain and canada and in israel which holds that after 30 years the majority of diplomatic documents previously classified as top secret are declassified and become accessible to researchers. once you have documents, it opens up an entirely new vista into the decision making process. that's what this book is really about, it's about decision making. in addition, in the last say 12 years, soviet documents, documents of the former soviet union have become available to researchers. the soviets played a pivotal war in the 1967 war. they precipita
to send molotov, a top general to washington in may i've '42, and june of '42 the united states said we are going to enup a second front before the end of the year in 1942. we promised that publicly and yet we don't open the second front until underof '44 and that's bass the british refused to go along with this and the united states and the british get involved in what marshall called periphery pecking in northern africa. marshall and eisenhower were serious. >> how did this lead to the cold war? >> because it led to a lot of mistrust between the united states and the soviets beginning -- the seeds of the colored war are visible during the war. and certain tension because the fact there was a second front, meant that the soviets had on their own to see that the german s -- were pushing across central europe and moving toward berlin, so we lost the military mission and on to diplomatic so there are doles being made between churchill and stalin of -- >> dividing up -- >> yeah, the british will get 90% of greece. the russians get 90% of bulgaria, and hungary, and divide it up that way. it
never get the "washington post" to print this point, but robert byrd when he was majority leader exercise the nuclear option four times. it goes back to the beginning of the senate whereby you set binding precedent in the senate by simple majority rules. furthermore, it was being used admittedly extraordinary, one that i think out to be used in very rare occasion, only for extenuating circumstances was done not to up in the tradition but to restore it. prior to 2003 derrick never been a judge, avril edition nominee denied confirmation deeply filibuster. never, never, never never. beginning with -- i think ultimately five judges who have the majority support, push judges who were all denied confirmation deeply filibuster though they had majority support. prior to that it'd never happen. so we are trying to restore the what it always been. you can argue that ought to be a majority. that had not been the standard pride 2003. on your question of time, you're right. biggest vulnerability is time. everything takes so long. i remember when it came to the house and i came over to the sen
. the clerk: washington, d.c, december 4, 2012. to the senate: under the provisions of rule 1, paragraph 3, of the standing rules of the senate, i hereby appoint the honorable christopher a. coons, a senator from the state of delaware, to perform the duties of the chai. signed: daniel k. inouye, president pro tempore. mr. reid: mr. president? the presiding officer: the majority leader. mr. reid: following leader remarks, the senate will proceed to executive session to consider the disabilities trite. the time until noon will be equally divided and controlled between the two leaders or their designees. at noon there will be a roll call vote on the resolution of advise and consent to the convention on rights of persons with disabilities. we don't do treaties often and there are requests from both --m senators on both sides of the aisle. i think the they're right, becae this is a treaty, the votes will take place from our desks today. everybody should be on notice. following the vote, mr. president, the senate will recess to allow for our weekly caucus meetings. additional votes in resolution
, with a critical eye at all could understand what our people on the ground were telling washington. we were out sourced security to a nonexistent government. we were pushing the theme of leading from behind to a fault. finally, i think it's fair to say that president bush sometimes went into strong without thinking of the consequences. i think it is fair to say that we're taking a backseat, a time of critical need for the world without thinking about the consequences. mr. president, the strategy you are employing of trying to lead from behind is allowing the mideast to blow up before our eyes. you need to engage based on reality. reality is that iraq is falling apart. if you don't do something very soon, the same thing that happened in libya is going to happen in iraq and other places throughout the world. >> thank you. i want to also ago the comments of my colleagues, senator mccain, senator graham. i appreciated the work done on the accountability review board report. there obviously was substantial work done on this, and when you to work on a bipartisan basis to implement the recommendations
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